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Dental Health

Oral cancer screenings 

 

 

Oral cancer screening is an examination performed by a dentist or doctor to look for signs of cancer or precancerous conditions in your mouth. The goal of oral cancer screening is to identify mouth cancer early, when there is a greater chance for a cure.The goal of oral cancer screening is to detect mouth cancer or precancerous lesions that may lead to mouth cancer at an early stage — when cancer or lesions are easiest to remove and most likely to be cured.

 People with a high risk of oral cancer may be more likely to benefit from oral cancer screening, though studies haven't clearly proved that. Factors that can increase the risk of oral cancer include:

 

  • Tobacco use of any kind, including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, chewing tobacco and snuff, among others
  • Heavy alcohol use
  • Previous oral cancer diagnosis
  • History of significant sun exposure, which increases the risk of lip cancer

 

Ask us about ways you can reduce your risk of oral cancer, such as quitting smoking and not drinking alcohol.


SEALANTS  


Teeth have natural grooves and can be a trap for harmful bacteria. We recommend placing sealants on teeth with especially deep grooves to help block any chance of decay. A flowable sealant material is used to fill in narrow grooves in a tooth that cannot be adequately cleaned by brushing. In some cases, the tooth structure has fine grooves or pits which accumulate plaque, not because the person doesn't brush, but because they're too narrow to allow even one bristle into them. These will develop cavities over time, and you don't want that. So the dentist will brush on a coating that seals the grooves and pits, making it possible to brush off all the plaque and keep your teeth healthy.



NON-SURGICAL PERIODONTAL GUM TREATMENTS  

The gums, ligaments, and bone around the teeth form the foundation for ones teeth. All structures are also referred to as the periodontium. When the periodontium is not healthy, it jeopardizes the teeth just as a bad foundation would threaten the stability of a house. Signs of unhealthy periodontium (gum disease) may be as follows: gums that are red and bleed easily, persistent bad breath, gums that are pulled away from the tooth, loose teeth, loss of bone support that holds the tooth in the jaw, and changes in the position or bite of the teeth. Any of these signs may mean something is wrong. With the proper care, however, it may be possible to return them to a healthy and maintained state. This is where appropriate gum treatments, such as nonsurgical deep scale and root planning, that go beyond a traditional cleaning come in. If you're having a problem, come in and see us so we can take care of it right away. The treatment usually involves a deep cleaning or root planing done under a local anesthetic, along with local antibiotic agents. If the gum disease gets too severe it may need to be treated through varies types of surgery such as LANAP laser, traditional flap or extraction. This is why it is important to get it treated at the first sign of a problem.

 

TEETH GRINDING & TMJ DISORDERS


 

TMJ stands for temporal-mandibular joint. Temporal, as in temple area of skull; mandibular as in mandible, or lower jaw; joint as in it's where the head and jaw meet. Problems in this joint may be caused by a misalignment of the teeth, trauma, or excess muscle tension. Aside from the two bones that meet there, cartilage buffers them and five muscles are involved in the area. If something goes wrong a good deal of trouble can result.

 Problems in this area can cause:

 

  • Headaches
  • Earaches
  • Trouble/soreness in opening and closing the mouth
  • Clicking or popping of the jaw
  • Pain in the jaw muscles
  • Soreness in the area, sometimes extending to the face
Contributing factors of TMJ disorders history of orthodontics, trauma, and clenching and grinding of teeth which is called Bruxism. Bruxism is a condition in which you grind, gnash or clench your teeth. If you have bruxism, you may unconsciously clench your teeth when you're awake (awake bruxism) or clench or grind them during sleep (sleep bruxism).

Sleep bruxism is considered a sleep-related movement disorder. People who clench or grind their teeth (brux) during sleep are more likely to have other sleep disorders, such as snoring and pauses in breathing (sleep apnea). Mild bruxism may not require treatment. However, in some people, bruxism can be frequent and severe enough to lead to jaw disorders, headaches, damaged teeth and other problems.

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of bruxism may include:

  • Teeth grinding or clenching, which may be loud enough to wake up your sleep partner
  • Teeth that are flattened, fractured, chipped or loose
  • Worn tooth enamel, exposing deeper layers of your tooth
  • Increased tooth pain or sensitivity
  • Tired or tight jaw muscles, or a locked jaw that won't open or close completely
  • Jaw, neck or face pain or soreness
  • Pain that feels like an earache, though it's actually not a problem with your ear
  • Dull headache starting in the temples
  • Damage from chewing on the inside of your cheek
  • Sleep disruption

 

 NIGHTGUARDS

  

 

 

Dental treatments for the condition can include balancing and adjusting the bite to help realign your bite pattern, wearing a custom made nightguard, whihch is a plastic mouthpiece that is worn at night while sleeping to prevent you from damaging the teeth, bone, gums and TMJ. If untreated and taken to extremes, surgery may be required to repair a badly damaged joint.



 DIGITAL X-RAYS

Our office uses Dexis digital radiography for our dental x-rays which allows us to take X-rays using 50-70% less radiation versus conventional X-ray films. This is led with computer monitoring, digital x-ray technology allows us to enhance the images for better diagnosis of any dental concerns.  This is a focused beam of X-Ray particles through bone which produces an image through a digital sensor connected to the computer. This gives the familiar black and white images that doctors and dentists use to diagnose problems. X-rays are a necessary part of the diagnostic process, and not to use them could lead to undiagnosed disease. Without an X-ray of the whole tooth, and supporting bone and gum tissues, there is no real way to detect infection or pathology that requires attention.